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Diálogos transatlánticos: Redes femeninas en los siglos XIX y XX / Transatlantic Dialogues: Women Networks between 19th and 20th centuries (ACLA)

Virtual
Organization: ACLA
Event: ACLA
Categories: Hispanic & Latino, Comparative, Literary Theory, Women's Studies
Event Date: 2021-04-08 to 2021-04-11 Abstract Due: 2020-10-31

In the transoceanic space, where sovereignty does not belong to any State, margins can speak. In this sense, transatlantic relations between women writers and intellectuals have multiplied since 19th century when they became a space for the creation of networks that legitimize and visibilize the “mujeres de letras” —especially after the birth of the new American States, and the construction of the Spanish Liberal State, as Pura Fernández expounds. In the case of women writers and intellectuals of 19th and 20th centuries, this transatlantic space created a transnational dialogue that illuminated and developed strategies enabling the participation of women in the public life, not only in the literary or artistic field but also in the political or ideological ones.
This seminar seeks to address the ways in which these networks operate, through which writers and intellectuals, both from Spain and from America they were built, and how those transatlantic dialogues became a space to think, speak and write. We invite proposals for papers —in both English and Spanish—, that reflect on the different approaches of these “mujeres de letras” to politics, art, and thought of the 19th and 20th centuries. Our goal is to examine the relationships they established through strong connection elements such as women’s press, classrooms, and literary gatherings, epistolary exchanges, academic visits, and especially the bonds born of both a common language and the shared experience of being a woman.

Papers can be submitted in English or Spanish.

https://acla.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/2/sessiongallery/77

isabel.murciaestrada@stonybrook.edu

Isabel Murcia Estrada