Locations
EVENT Mar 10
ABSTRACT Sep 25
Abstract days left 0
Viewed 138 times

NeMLA 2022 - CPF Decentering the White Male Gaze in Beowulf (NeMLA)

Baltimore
Event: NeMLA
Categories: Interdisciplinary, British, Popular Culture, Gender & Sexuality, Women's Studies, Medieval, Early Modern & Renaissance, Long 18th Century, Romantics, Victorian, 20th & 21st Century, Aesthetics, Anthropology/Sociology, Classical Studies, Cultural Studies, Environmental Studies, Film, TV, & Media, Food Studies, History, Philosophy
Event Date: 2022-03-10 to 2022-03-11 Abstract Due: 2021-09-25 Abstract Deadline has passed

Beowulf studies has traditionally been the domain of white male scholars who have historically dominated both the scholarship and translations of the poem. This session seeks to decenter the white male gaze and invites novel perspectives from often marginalized voices in the field to contribute to the many ongoing academic conversations focused on Beowulf.

Although in the field of Beowulf studies, Beowulf has been long been regarded as poem about men and for men, this session rejects such notions and seeks to highlight the formative role women play both in the poem and in the scholarship. Moreover, this session intends to explore the role of race in both the poem and the scholarship, and scholars of color, who have even more underrepresented that women in the field, are especially encouraged to submit proposals. Some recommended topics might include discussion of the role of women in the poem or women’s contributions to scholarship and translations of Beowulf. Other recommended topics might include exploring the role of race and tribalism in the poem, highlighting scholars of color’s contributions to Beowulf studies or centering the perspectives of the monsters.

Please send paper proposals (along with your contact information and a brief academic biography) and/or questions directly to session organizer, Richard Fahey at rfahey@nd.edu. Unless otherwise directed, he will submit the panel details to the conference.

rfahey@nd.edu

Richard Fahey