Teaching With Archives: Current and Past Pedagogical Practices (Roundtable)


Pedagogy & Professional

Grace Wetzel (Saint Joseph’s University)

In “The Archival Turn’s Pedagogical Turn” (2017), Wendy Hayden has documented rich and “varied ways of teaching with archives” (134). Possibilities include classroom incorporation of specific archival materials, assignments involving archival research, rhetorical analysis of archives, and opportunities for students to create archives. This roundtable invites presentations that share innovative approaches to integrating archives into the rhetoric, composition, or literature undergraduate classroom and that pose corresponding questions or present challenges for discussion. This roundtable also invites presentations that consider ways in which teachers of the past—especially within extracurricular settings, often venues “for resistance that was not ordinarily available” in classrooms—have innovatively taught with archives (Schultz “Young Composers” 134).

Roundtable contributors are particularly encouraged to consider: interrelations among archives, power relations, public memory, and pedagogy; what constitutes an archives; and the rhetoricity of archives. Please submit abstracts by September 30, 2020. For more information, please email Grace Wetzel at gwetzel@sju.edu.

Statement of significance: As Wendy Hayden has observed, scholars have lately “expanded archival research pedagogies to undergraduate students, inspiring us to think about the many ways we can incorporate archives into undergraduate instruction” (134). This roundtable offers a forum for collaboratively thinking about teaching with archives through attention to both current undergraduate instruction and innovative historical pedagogical practices—especially within extracurricular settings.

This roundtable invites presentations that share innovative approaches to integrating archives into the rhetoric, composition, or literature undergraduate classroom and that pose corresponding questions or present challenges for discussion. This roundtable also invites presentations that consider ways in which teachers of the past—especially within extracurricular settings—have innovatively taught with archives.